Using Photographs In Your Publicity Campaigns

When you are sending out press releases and working on getting free publicity, photos will help you build both name and face recognition for you.

Both are VERY important.

So what kind of photos should you send with your press releases? How big should they be? What should they show?

If you want to send a photo along with your press release, send them both in a #10 envelope. Include a photo that’s either 3×5″ or 4×6″. There’s no need to send a larger photo. If the reporter wants to enlarge your photo he can have it done very easily.

All publicity photos you send, without exception, should be in color. It’s easy for a reporter to make a black and white out of your color photo, but it’s impossible to take your black and white and turn it into a color photo. With more and more newspapers printing photos in color, color photos are the only way to go.

On the back of your photo put a label that has your name, address, phone number and a brief description of what the photo is about.

If there are people in the photo, identify each one in order from left to right.

Also describe the subject of the photo. Don’t assume that the reporter will know who the people are or what the subject is.

Don’t write on the back of your photo with a pen or pencil. You’ll probably damage the photo for use because your writing will make an impression on the image side. A label is the way to go when identifying your photo.

Also, if you don’t have a label on your photo and it gets separated from your press release, the chances of it being
reunited with the press release is darned slim. You’ll lose your opportunity to have your photo published.

If you submit your press releases online, you can either attach photos or you can indicate in your press release where the photos can be found. But, unless a reporter has specifically asked you to attach photos to an email, it’s best to have the photos available somewhere else to download.

You might post your publicity photos on a special page on your website. In your press release you would put the link to your publicity photos.

Be sure to have your photos in 300 dpi format. Dpi means dots per inch. The standard format for web-based photos is 72 dpi, but that will not be of a quality good enough to print in a newspaper or magazine.

Press releases that come with high quality, interesting photos is a winning combination you should be using to get more interviews, more publicity and more people finding out about your business.

Copyright Paul Hartunian. All rights reserved. Do you need more help getting free publicity for your business? Paul Hartunian has all the help you need at: Paul Hartunian’s website and Paul Hartunian’s Million Dollar Publicity Strategies where you’ll find free publicity tips, free articles, free coaching call replays that will make getting free publicity for your business a snap! Plus you’ll find information about Paul’s Million Dollar Publicity System, the whole story of how he sold the Brooklyn Bridge and plenty more. And, for just $7 you can get 3 issues of Paul’s publicity newsletter, 3 of his best strategy reports, personal coaching from Paul and your very own, authentic piece of the world famous Brooklyn Bridge. No need to hunt for top quality information on how to get free publicity. Paul Hartunian has it all for you.

Comments

  1. says

    Most media seem to prefer digital artwork. I’ve had author photos printed in a bio or other press material, but as far as sending out an actual glossy photo with the press material, it’s probably been over a decade since I did that.

    I note on my press material where artwork can be downloaded, include it in my signature, send links to the download pages or digital files as requested.
    Kama Timbrell recently posted..About KamaMy Profile

  2. says

    Kama, these days I send almost everything–press releases, photos, etc.–digitally. However, there may be occasions where you want to mail a press release. In that case, you may choose to send a photo. I would still note the availability of digital photos because, as you note, most media will want to work with digital photos.

    Thanks for the comment.