How to Overcome Writer’s Block

Writer’s block is one of those problems that somehow defies a clear description or explanation.

It’s tough to tie down and be clear about what it really is, simply because every writer’s experience of writer’s block is a little different.

But the end result is the same…one day we are writing well and productively. And the next day we come to a grinding halt.

Writer’s block can slow down or halt our writing progress for a couple of hours, a couple of days or for even longer.

So what’s the answer? How do we deal with it?

I won’t pretend to have the answer for everyone in every situation, but I do know of two major issues that can severely reduce our productivity as writers.

First, ask yourself whether you really WANT to be writing whatever it is you’re working on when you grind to a halt.

When we write on projects that simply don’t appeal to us, our subconscious minds have a powerful and infuriating ability to sabotage even our best efforts.

If you don’t truly want to be working on whatever it is you are writing when you’re struck by writer’s block, it may be time to step back and make some tough choices about the kinds of writing projects you should be choosing.

The second major cause of writer’s block or procrastination is when you don’t prepare for your writing task.

Whatever the projects I’m working on, I plan a structure or outline in advance. I gather together any reference materials I might need. I set aside a time for writing.

In other words, I get ready and allocate a block of time.

This means that when I start writing I can simply follow the outline from beginning to end. I don’t have to pause and wonder about what is coming next. Nor do I have to stop and do research mid-way through the writing phase.

If you confine yourself to taking on writing projects that really appeal to you, and you prepare thoroughly before you start writing, you should find yourself free of writer’s block most of the time.

For more help in putting writer’s block behind you, follow the Writing Rituals method…


  1. says

    I find that when I’m stuck trying to write something, I go back and look at what I just wrote. Then, instead of moving the story forward, I take the same scenario and write it in another character’s perspective. This allows me to keep “those creative juices flowing” and also develop other characters and make more than just the main character dynamic and round.